The Great British Graphic Novel at the Cartoon Museum

GBGN_WEBSITE_BANNERThis exhibition in London really is too good to miss. Curated by Anita O’Brien, director of the museum, and Dr Paul Williams of the University of Exeter, it is substantial and represents its subject meticulously and fully. For this FPI blog reviewer, viewing it seems to have been a quite overwhelming experience. Also check out Down the Tubes and this enthusiastic Spectator review. The exhibition is running until 24th July.

Great-British-Graphic-NovelIt is structured around seven interlocking thematic strands, with Hunt Emerson’s excellent ‘tube map’ to guide you. With William Hogarth’s Harlot’s Progess as its starting point, it tracks the development of an art form and emphasises the diversity and breadth of talent. Fabulous – I must go back and browse when there aren’t so many people in the way! You see, we were at the lively opening night there last week. Here’s a few photos from the evening.
B speakingB&OscarPosy, B&MPosy speakingB&NicolaStreeten2Kates&?
Bryan and I will be back at the Cartoon Museum on the evening of Wednesday 4th May when, in conjunction with the exhibition, we will be presenting our new collaboration, The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utopia.

Other forthcoming events linked to the exhibition are a Graphic Novel Night on Thursday 12th May and Laydeez Do Comics evenings on Monday 20th June and Monday 18th July.

Counting down to Wonderlands

Wonderlands logoWith just over two weeks to go, expectations are high for the U.K’s first ever graphic novel expo, Wonderlands. We’ve a long list of guests that includes Posy Simmonds, Dave Gibbons, Hunt Emerson, Paul Gravett, Steve Bell and Dylan Horrocks, a full day of talks and panels on different aspects of the graphic novel form and an alternative schedule of workshops and master classes, so this promises to be a unique event. The publisher’s hall, hosting a range of exhibitors and publishers from biggies to small press, the showing of the documentary The Graphic Novel Man, the giant graphic novel She Lives being presented throughout the day by creator Woodrow Phoenix and a “how to” forum on self-publishing are all icing on the cake. Being a one-day event means that attenders don’t have to stop overnight and, to top it off, the whole event is FREE, even the panels and workshops, though booking in advance for the workshops – through the website here – is advisable, as places are limited. Schedule organizer, writer/artist Bryan Talbot, who’s also one of the founders of the Lakes International Comics Art Festival, said “For any lovers of the comics medium, or for artists in search of a publisher, this will be an unmissable event.”
Wonderlands covers

I’ll be there, of course, and I’ll be involved in a panel discussion on historical and biographical graphic novels, along with Kate Charlesworth, Darryl Cunningham and Al Davison (chaired by Paul Gravett).

Wonderlands logoAlice in S page 28 crop

Handbook of Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Handbook coverAlso out this month is a rather different sort of publication that I’ve contributed to. It’s the second edition of an enormous reference tome for students and scholars of gender, sexuality and language. If it’s anything like the first edition, the contributions will all be highly readable scholarship with global reach and relevance. And it’s a snip at £120!

The book is The Handbook of Language, Gender and Sexuality and it’s edited by Susan Ehrlich, Miriam Meyerhoff and Janet Holmes.

My contribution is Chapter 31 Language, Gender and Popular Culture. It contains sections on Popular culture; Magazines, friendship and community; Broadcast talk, gendered styles and professional identities; Talking with the television; Creative engagement: putting gender on the agenda. The last section focuses on cartoons and comics and draws examples from Posy Simmonds and, briefly, from my own Dotter of her Father’s Eyes. Well, fancy that!

 

A weekend at the Lakes International Comic Art Festival

Lakes fest 1What an amazing weekend it was over in Kendal! Not even the rain could dampen our spirits. What were the high points for me? It’s hard to say. It was wonderful to catch up with Trina Robbins and Steve Leialoha. It was a great pleasure to spend time with Joe Sacco and Amalie. Great getting to know José Muñoz and Fiorella, who we even got to take home with us afterwards! There were so many stimulating talks and presentations – I just wish I could have attended more of them, but there were so many lovely people to talk to as well.

Lakes fest 2I particularly enjoyed doing the Sally Heathcote, Suffragette presentation with Bryan and Kate. The audience in the library did too, I think! It’s the first time we’ve talked about Sally Lakes fest 3publicly, as a creative team.

Overall, just hanging out with so many comics creators and enthusiasts for a weekend was a delight. Thanks to the people of Kendal! Hurrah for the organisers of the Lakes International Comic Art Festival and all its sponsors!

DSC00108Here’s some pre-festival coverage in The Guardian. Laura Sneddon gives women writers and artists more-than-equal billing, which is, to say the least, unusual! The BBC news website for England also gave the festival some great coverage on the day it began.

Photographs by courtesy of Kate Charlesworth and Dianne Barry.

Dan Franklin and Posy Simmonds seemed to enjoy the desserts

Dan Franklin and Posy Simmonds seemed to enjoy the desserts

Kate Charlesworth finally met Dan Franklin, our publisher for Sally Heathcote, Suffragette

Kate Charlesworth finally met Dan Franklin, our publisher for Sally Heathcote, Suffragette

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